May 2017 Posts

Getting Ready for Summer by Sherry Kyle

Tyndale Kids

Summer is right around the corner, and for most moms, this can be an overwhelming time. Sign-ups for summer camp and swim lessons are on the budget-conscious mom’s mind and so is the need for family fun! Try these action steps to help everyone transition to a stress-free summer.

calendar-ready-for-summer

1. Calendar. Hang a calendar in a prominent place in the kitchen and have your child make an X at the end of each day. Kids love to see the countdown to summer, and it will help moms mentally prepare too.

2. Family Meeting. Now is a good time to sit down with your kids and discuss summer plans. Family vacation? Once a week beach day? An activity or team they want to join? Kids need something to look forward to, and when everyone is on the same page, it makes for a smoother transition.

swimsuit-girl-on-beach

3. Stock Up. Make sure your child’s closet is stocked with plenty of shorts and t-shirts. A new swimsuit, if needed, is good to have on hand and so is a beach towel and a pair of flip-flops. Make sure you have a well-stocked first aid kit, as well as an adequate supply of bug repellent and sunscreen.

4. Friends. The hardest thing about summer for kids is taking a break from their friends, but that doesn’t have to be the case. Make sure to exchange phone numbers with the parents before the school year is out, and plan times to meet over the summer months.

5. Routine. As much as we’d like to think we’re going to keep the same schedule, it’s best to let that one slide. Let’s face it, summer is a whole lot different from the school year, so why try to keep the same pace? Some routine, like meals and sleeping habits, are good to maintain but, otherwise, enjoy the kickback days of summer.ice-cream-cone

6. Meals. Speaking of meals, summer is a good time to change things up. Get your kids involved with the planning. Pizza and ice cream on Tuesdays? Hamburgers on Thursdays? Why not! Add several picnics at local parks or interesting sights, and you’re sure to have a relaxed summer!

7. Books. Keep your kids’ minds in gear over the summer, and schedule visits to your local library to get a stack of books to read. Have a goal and give rewards, such as a movie or a trip to the local museum. (Remember, audiobooks and comic books count as reading too!) Summer is also a good time to hire a tutor if your child needs help with school.

diy-summer-journal

8. Creativity. There will definitely be times when your kids are bored, so make sure you leave wiggle room in your summer to be creative. These are a few ideas: bake cookies, make an obstacle course in the backyard, go on a nature walk, paint a picture, plant a garden, or keep a journal (like this DIY journal!).

lemons-for-lemonade-stand

9. Community. Consider doing a few community service projects with your kids this summer, such as organizing a food drive in your neighborhood, hosting a garage sale or lemonade stand then donating the proceeds to your favorite charity, creating care packages for the homeless, picking up litter at your local beach or park, making cards for soldiers, or visiting the elderly.

10. You. With everyone home for the summer, make sure you take time for YOU! A hot bath, a trip to the nail salon, or an afternoon with a friend will rejuvenate you and keep the stress away. Take a few moments every day for some deep breaths and remember to capture every moment. Summer will be over before you know it!


sherry-kyle-authorSherry Kyle has written several books for tween girls, along with women’s fiction. Her award-winning book for tween girls, The Christian Girl’s Guide to Style, was awarded the God Mom’s Choice Award. Her second nonfiction book for girls, The Girl’s Guide to Your Dream Room, was nominated for the Christian Retailers Best Awards. Most recently, Sherry is the author of Love, Lexi, a unique fictional story combined with a devotional and journal to allow readers to learn to seek God first above all else. 

 

 


For additional tips on how to maximize summer fun while cutting down on stress, check out these suggestions from Tyndale Kids author Kathryn O’Brien!


 

The Most Crucial Issue for Today’s Church

I’m convinced that the most crucial issue for today’s church is its own belief in the deity of Christ.

This may seem like an obvious truth; after all, Christ’s deity is foundational to the Christian faith.

But in the history of the church, the issue of the deity of Christ has been on the ­center stage of conflict within the church for four centuries: the fourth century, the fifth century, the nineteenth century, and now the twentieth century.

It was very fashionable one hundred years ago, with the rise of so-called modern historical critical scholarship, to raise questions about the church’s faith in its Lord, its faith in the deity of Christ himself.

There was a whole school of theologians who had many good things to say about ­Jesus.

 

They appreciated his ethical teaching, and they applauded his agenda for social concern.

But they believed that the New ­Testament portrait of ­Jesus, which emphasized his deity and his work of cosmic redemption through giving an atonement and being raised from the dead and performing miracles, was a manifestation of prescientific, rather naive first-century people who were very much influenced by unsophisticated varieties of mythology.

In the nineteenth century there was a major crisis not only in the secular world but in the church itself that one twentieth-century theologian has called (accurately, I believe) “a crisis of unbelief.”

And that crisis is by no means over.

In many cases the issue is underground because there is still common courtesy.

People expect someone who is a church member or particularly a clergyman to at least give lip service to the deity of Christ.

It is still a dangerous thing for a minister to come out boldly and publicly deny the deity of Christ.

That happened a few years ago in one mainline denomination, and overnight it was in Time magazine.

The secular world was astonished to hear religious people denying the very heart of their own religion.

But if you get outside the public eye and get into the inner machinations of the academic environment of the Christian church, into the Christian colleges and ­seminaries, then you hear issues of Christ’s deity openly debated and in many cases denied by professors.

So I think that what is at stake—the greatest issue at stake—for the Christian church today is Christ. Do we affirm his lordship and his deity?


From Now, That’s a Good Question! by R.C. Sproul

Now That’s a Good Question! answers more than 300 challenging questions about life and faith.

Sproul, a distinguished theologian and educator, address doctrinal points and contemporary issues such as euthanasia, evolution, and abortion. His answers cover over three hundred topics in a personable, easy-to-read style that’s perfect for the lay person. New believers as well as those older in the faith will find this book a great resource for those challenging questions of life and faith.

Learn more HERE.

A Day at the Beach – Beach Prize Pack Giveaway

Do you yearn for a day at the beach where your mind and soul can wander away from life’s troubles? Do you gaze up at the sun or the nighttime stars and wonder if God is really on your side? Do you long to hear his quiet voice in the roll of a gentle wave? In A Day at the Beach, brothers Todd and Jedd Hafer don’t have the answers to all of life’s troubles, but they’ll help you see that the God who built the universe also wants to help you build a great life. Let these encouraging words bring a ray of warm sunshine to your doorstep as Todd and Jedd offer their joy-filled perspectives on life and faith. So take a deep breath, unplug from life’s daily grind, and follow the call of your heart to Jesus, the ultimate source of life. Learn more: <<click here>>

 

To celebrate the summer and the release of A Day at the Beach we’re giving away a beach themed prize pack!

 

Here’s what you could win:

  • Studded Sunglasses
  • Canvas Beach Bag
  • Flip Flops, Size 7
  • Round Beach Towel
  • Gold Pineapple Keychain
  • Ceramic Seashell Travel Mug
  • Pineapple Coin Purse
  • A Day at the Beach Book

$130 value

Here’s how to enter:

Fill out the Gleam form below. Follow the sharing directions to earn extra entries. We’ll choose one winner on June 5th! You must be over 18 and a US resident to enter.

Beach Prize Pack

How to Lead Like Jesus

What can you learn from Jesus as a leader?

Jesus said to the people who believed in him, “You are truly my disciples if you remain faithful to my teachings. And you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.”

Leaders define reality by developing a worldview and perspective that enable them to interpret life from the eternal vantage point of God’s truth.

The truth, even when it’s hard, sets people free from ignorance and deception.

Reflect on these truths from Scripture as you evaluate your role as leader in your home, workplace, church, or among your peers. 

1. Leaders submit themselves to the ultimate Leader, God. (Mark 3:14)

2. Leaders develop teams in community, sharing life and responsibilities and gaining strength from mutual encouragement and accountability. (Matthew 7:28-29)

3. Leaders equip and release those they lead. They provide the wisdom and experience necessary, then let go and allow others to take responsibility for the tasks. (Luke 10:17, 20)

4. Leaders have a clear sense of mission and dedicate themselves to fulfilling that mission. (Acts 1:8)

5. Leaders accept expressions of genuine love and gratitude. (Matthew 26:37-38)

6. Leaders are vulnerable. (John 13:1, 4-5)


From TouchPoints for Leaders by Ronald A. Beers, V. Gilbert Beers, and Douglas J. Rumford

Helping readers find what God has to say about their particular needs is what the TouchPoints series is all about. TouchPoints for Leaders puts God’s words of encouragement and affirmation at the fingertips of today’s Christian leaders. Each section starts with a key question, which is answered through Scripture, and ends with a promise from God’s Word.

Learn more HERE.

Ebenezer: Memorial Stones to Guide Our Children by Sarah Rubio

Tyndale Kids

memorial-wreath

Monday, we will celebrate Memorial Day. If you visit or drive by a cemetery or war monument, you’ll see wreaths and flowers laid to honor and you’ll remember those who sacrificed their lives while serving in our country’s armed forces. These flowers, and the stones they decorate, serve as memorials—reminders—to those of us who have benefited from that sacrifice.

Thinking about memorials reminds me of my favorite biblical monument, the one Israel’s last judge, Samuel, called Ebenezer: “Samuel then took a large stone and placed it between the towns of Mizpah and Jeshanah. He named it Ebenezer (which means ‘the stone of help’), for he said, ‘Up to this point the Lord has helped us!’” (1 Samuel 7:12).

ebenezer-stone

The Ebenezer monument commemorates a miraculous victory God won for his people against one of their greatest enemies, the Philistines (see 1 Samuel 7:3-13). Following Samuel’s instructions, the Israelites had gathered at Mizpah to recommit themselves to God. The Philistines got word of this convocation and decided to attack. The terrified Israelites begged God to save them, and the Lord responded in dramatic fashion: “The Lord spoke with a mighty voice of thunder from heaven that day, and the Philistines were thrown into such confusion that the Israelites defeated them” (1 Samuel 7:10). After the battle, Samuel set up the Ebenezer stone to remind Israel of their God’s faithfulness.

I think remembrance is one of the most important reasons we start recounting the Bible’s historical narratives to our children from such a young age—not just because they are entertaining, or an engaging entry point into Scripture, but because of what they help us remember about God. The creation account reminds us that God is our Source, that he is joyful and creative, that he delights in what he has made. The story of Noah and the Flood reminds us that God preserves even as he purifies. In the story of Abraham’s near-sacrifice of Isaac, we remember that God provides (see Genesis 22:14); his provision of a ram to sacrifice in Isaac’s place foreshadows his greatest provision of all—Jesus, the perfect sacrifice and substitute.

It has been my privilege in recent years to edit some beautiful Bible storybooks for Tyndale Kids—books that I use to set up “memorial stones” for my own children, and that I hope and pray will become such memorials for thousands of other parents and children. Here are some of my favorites:

 

god-made-the-world-sarah-jean-collins

God Made the World by Sarah Jean Collins—Author/illustrator Sarah Jean Collins celebrates God’s artistry with her beautiful geometric illustrations. The fun shapes and bright colors are a feast for grown-up and tiny eyes alike, and the sturdy board-book pages are easy for little hands to turn. This is the perfect first Bible storybook for babies and toddlers. (Releasing October 2017.)

 

the-hurry-up-exit-from-egypt-gary-bower

The Faith that God Built series by Gary Bower—These four cumulative rhyming stories (The Beautiful Garden of Eden, A Patch on the Peak of Ararat, The Hurry-Up Exit from Egypt, and The Frightening Philippi Jail) commemorate big moments in the history of God’s people in a fresh way. Each book points the reader back to the Book with a key Scripture verse and a reference to the entire passage the story is taken from.

 

the-story-travelers-bible-tracey-madder

The Story Travelers Bible by Tracey Madder—This 85-story volume is a great entry into the world of the Bible for young grade-schoolers. Kids join Lana, Munch, and Griffin on an epic adventure to find out more about the people, places, and events of the Bible. The book includes informational features, application points, and memory verses to help kids go deeper, and each story includes its biblical source reference.

It is good and right for us to place or contemplate one of the memorials honoring our fallen soldiers this weekend. But I pray that you will also take some time to place a memorial of God’s faithfulness in the life of a child dear to you. “Up to this point the Lord has helped us!”—and because “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever” (Hebrews 13:8)—we know that he will help us through every point ahead.


sarah-rubioEditor Sarah Rubio grew up as a missionary kid in Ecuador and holds a bachelor of arts in communication from Wheaton College. She joined Tyndale’s editorial team in 2007, working mainly on Spanish books until transitioning to English nonfiction and children’s in 2014. One of the first Tyndale products she encountered was a One Year Bible that her father read with her every year from the age of eight to eighteen. Sarah loves challenging authors to be better writers while they’re challenging her with the ideas in their books. She lives in Chicago’s northwest suburbs with her husband and children.


Find more #tyndalekids books today for your young readers at tyndale.com/youth.