June 2017 Posts

Kids Summer Reading eBook Deals!

Tyndale Kids

kids-summer-reading-ebook-deals

This July, we’re promoting several Tyndale Kids eBooks for only $0.99. As your elementary school children work toward accomplishing their summer reading goals—whether at home or on the road—encourage them to borrow your eReader and give these five fun titles a try! Click on the titles or book covers below to learn more.


willie's-redneck-time-machineWillie’s Redneck Time Machine (Be Your Own Duck Commander #1) by John Luke Robertson—Willie finds a mysterious wooden crate in the Duck Commander warehouse. Only John Luke is around, so the two of them open the box and find a time machine! Willie and John Luke test the machine and find themselves journeying back and forth in time.

 

death-trapDeath Trap (Robot Wars #1) by Sigmund Brouwer—Set in an experimental community on Mars in the year 2039, The Robot Wars series features fourteen-year-old virtual reality specialist Tyce Sanders. Life on the red planet is not always easy, but it is definitely exciting. Tyce finds that the mysteries of the planet point to his greatest discovery—a new relationship with God.

 

wild-thingWild Thing (Winnie the Horse Gentler #1) by Dandi Daley Mackall—Twelve-year-old Winnie Willis has a way with horses, but other parts of her life don’t always come as easily. Along with her dad and sister, Lizzy, Winnie is learning how to live without her mom. As Winnie teaches her horses about unconditional love and blind trust, God shows Winnie that he can be trusted too.  In Wild Thing, Winnie’s fearful heart finally begins to trust God again as she tries to gentle the horse of her dreams, Wild Thing.

 

haunted-watersHaunted Waters (Red Rock Mysteries #1) by Jerry B. Jenkins and Chris Fabry—Watch out! The Timberline twins are on the loose. Bryce and Ashley are ATV-riding tweens from Colorado who unearth action-packed mystery and adventure wherever they go. From clearing the name of a local miscreant to thwarting a gold-stealing heist, the twins’ growing faith and the strong example of their parents guide them through even the most life-threatening situations.

 

the-vanishingsThe Vanishings (Left Behind: The Kids #1) by Jerry B. Jenkins and Tim LaHaye—This series is based on the best-selling adult Left Behind series. Readers will see the Rapture and Tribulation through the eyes of four kids who have been left behind.

 

 


Click here to download a FREE Summer Reading Chart for your kids!

For a more complete list of Tyndale Kids chapter books (all available in eBook), head to tyndale.com/kids/fiction


Wow Your Kids with God’s Good News

Tyndale Kids

How would your kids react if you told them you were heading out on a trip to Disney World tomorrow? Would that good news thrill them? I’m guessing they would probably jump up and down, maybe yell with excitement, and want to share their happiness with all of their friends.

How can you foster that kind of enthusiasm in your kids when they think about the good news of the gospel? It can be daunting to think about teaching your children to love and follow Christ. We often feel unequipped to be the teacher in this case. But, take heart, it’s really not that hard! Below are four simple ways you can help your little ones develop a love and passion for what God has done for them.

 

wow!-the-good-news-in-four-words

1. Meet them at their level. Use age appropriate language and activities as you introduce your children to the greatest story ever told. If you are talking above their level, boredom can set in and their attention will wander—along with their little bodies. Presenting the gospel at a level they can understand will not only encourage learning but will also help it stick with them for the rest of their lives. If you are looking for a book to help explain the gospel in a simple, but profound way, take a look at Wow! The Good News in Four Words by Dandi Daley Mackall. You and your kids will love it!

 

father-with-daughter-on-dock2. Make it interactive. Children are kinesthetic learners, meaning they tend to learn by physically engaging in the learning process. Studies show that kids retain more information when they use multiple senses as they take in new concepts. You can capitalize on this by playing games, creating opportunities for them to recreate what they have learned through artistic expression such as coloring and painting, and acting out various Bible stories together.

 

 

mother-researching-with-kids3. Engage kids in the learning process. Think of ways your children can help you research Bible stories, figure out the meanings of words they don’t already know, and learn more about the cultural and geographical background of a Bible story. The more they are responsible for learning themselves, the more they will remember as they grow up.

 

 

 

family-together-by-river4. Let them see your love for God and His story. One of the most important things you can do as a parent is to model a genuine love and thankfulness to God for who He is and all He has done for us. Children are very perceptive, and your authentic excitement for the gospel will help to create a desire in them to build the same type of relationship with their Heavenly Father.

 

 

 

Developing a love for God and an attitude of gratefulness for what He has done for us can be a delight for you as a parent and a life-changing experience for your child. Start today and watch your kids flourish as they grow to love the One who created them.


Linda Howard is Associate Publisher for Kids and Youth products at Tyndale House Publishers. She has been with Tyndale since 2007.

Having Faith Conversations with Your Kids by Crystal Bowman and Teri McKinley

Tyndale Kids

If you’ve spent any time around young children, you know they are full of questions. They ask things like: “Why is the sky blue?” “Where does the water in the bathtub go?” and “Does God ever fall asleep?” These endless questions are the inspiration behind our new picture book series, I’ve Got Questions, published by Tyndale Kids. The first two titles, Do Baby Bears Have Mommies? and Does God Take Naps?, explore both the humorous and perplexing questions children often ask in a whimsical rhyming format. As a mother-daughter writing team, we reflected on the way story time can often turn into question time. This pattern presents a beautiful opportunity to use reading as a means of initiating faith conversations with the children in our lives. As we anticipate these conversations, we can be equipped with simple strategies to navigate them.

 

boy-praying-with-bible

 

We can teach children about the person of God. Children can be taught that there’s a God in heaven, but we can go deeper when we explain that God is someone they can know. Knowing that God hears their prayers and even knows what they are thinking, gives children the confidence they need to approach a holy God. You can help children understand that God is more than a spiritual being somewhere out there. Even though it may be hard to grasp at first, children can begin to understand that God is like a friend—someone they can talk to anytime of the day or night. He is always available to listen, and he is never too busy to care. Even if you don’t have all the answers, it’s okay. Certain aspects of God are beyond our understanding. (As we say in Does God Take Naps?, “I know it’s hard to understand, but God will always be.”) The more children learn about the character of God, the more comfortable they will be in pursuing a relationship with him.

 

girl-walking-on-beach

 

We can teach children about God’s role as Creator through our daily experiences. As the children in your life notice things in nature, take the initiative to point out God’s love and care in all that he has created. Talk about how God looks after the birds and that he looks after people too. We can show children God’s creativity and artistry by pointing out that he paints the sunsets and decides which color every flower should be. Teaching children that God takes care of the natural world can build their sense of security in knowing that he is big enough to care for them. In Do Baby Bears Have Mommies? we state it this way: “He made amazing creatures on land and in the air. And every creature he has made is always in his care.” Nature is God’s tangible evidence of his existence. Let children know who made all the things they see and touch by pointing them to the Creator.

 

boy-reading-bible

 

We can teach children that God speaks to them through the Bible.
Children quickly learn that prayer is how they can talk to God, but understanding that God speaks to them is more difficult for them to grasp. Young children are often introduced to the Bible through kid-friendly Bible story books that feature the more familiar stories in Scripture. Though many of these are excellent resources, we can also show them specific Bible verses that speak directly to them. Here are a few:

  • Jeremiah 33:3—“Call to me and I will answer you.”
  • Matthew 19:14—“Jesus said, ‘Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.’”
  • 1 John 3:1—“The Father has loved us so much! He loved us so much that we are called children of God. And we really are his children.”

 

According to a recent study done in the United Kingdom, preschoolers ask an average of three hundred questions per day. That’s a lot of questions! But our hope is that you feel equipped to handle some of their questions about faith and guide those conversations. And if you want to explore some light-hearted questions with the children in your life, check out the I’ve Got Questions series. The best part is that the answers are included in the book!


crystal-bowman-teri-mckinley-authors

Crystal Bowman is a former preschool teacher, award-winning author, national speaker, and Mentor for MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers). She has written more than 100 books for children, three books for women, numerous magazine articles, and Bible study materials. She also writes stories for Clubhouse Jr. magazine and lyrics for children’s piano music.

She has written books for many popular children’s series, such as Little Blessings, BOZ the Bear, and I Can Read! She has co-authored Our Daily Bread for Kids, My Mama and Me, and M is for Manger with her daughter, Teri McKinley. She and her husband live in Florida.

To learn more about Crystal, head to her website, or find her on Facebook.

Teri McKinley grew up in the world of publishing, attending book signings and book conventions with her mother, Crystal Bowman. She began writing stories in elementary school and her love for writing grew in college. In addition to co-authoring several award-winning books with her mother, Teri has written greeting cards for Discovery House. Teri and her husband live in Texas and serve in several ministries at their church. Above all, Teri’s favorite job is being a mom to their son.

To learn more about Teri, find her on Facebook or Pinterest.


Head to Tyndale.com today to discover additional books written by Crystal Bowman and Teri McKinley.


Friendships and Water Go Together by Karen Whiting

Tyndale Kids

boy-laughing-in-water

Splish! Splash! Children gravitate to water fun; and giggles increase with a friend to splash along. Let your child invite one or more friends to come and play outside with water. Keep towels on hand for children who want to dry their eyes, and be sure to encourage young ones in taking turns and sharing. Snap some photos so your child can talk about the time after their friend leaves then e-mail the pictures to the friend. The photos will help them remember the fun they shared and will help build bonds between them.

 

Fun and Safety

A pool is fun and helps with gross motor skills, but even basins of water or sprinklers can be a hit. Discuss water safety before letting children take a plunge. Children can drown in just an inch of water. Teach your child to relax around water but not to go in without an adult, even if they know how to swim. It’s a good habit to make a simple adult-supervisor necklace. Use a small plastic lid and write “Adult” on it with a permanent marker. Punch a hole and string the lid on a cord. Have an adult wear it to make sure there is someone designated to watch the children.

 

Water! Water Everywhere!

Simple water fun can be done anywhere outside. Paintbrushes and buckets of water make it fun to paint disappearing art on almost any surface outdoors. It’s also a great way to get children to help clean outdoor areas!

Freeze some colored water before friends arrive to add to the cool excitement.

 

girls-playing-with-water

 

Do a sponge toss.

Count how many children will be participating in the activity, noting the ages of each child. Cut a sponge apart for every child, creating enough pieces to match how many years old each child is. (For example, a three-year-old’s sponge would be cut into three pieces.) Number each sponge’s pieces starting with the number one, and toss the labeled sponge pieces into the water. Starting with number one, the children should grab each piece of their sponge. While the older children may be faster, the younger ones will have fewer to collect. Then use the wet sponges for a water-sponge toss. (Optional: Use different colored sponges for each child.)

 

Water and Faith

Set up a station with dolls for girls to bathe their babies. Boys can set up a wash station for their riding toys or action figures. Talk about baptism and Jesus while they clean their dolls or other toys. Let them try some feats with action figures and dolls such as walking on the water. Talk about Jesus and water (he boated, walked on water, and even calmed a storm).

 

Differences in Ability

You’ll probably notice a big difference in swimming ability among children. Since my late husband served in the Coast Guard, we taught our babies to swim starting at two weeks old. Other children might not start lessons until they are school age. Don’t start a swim competition unless children have equal swimming ability.

 

 

Water and Math

All of them can enjoy splashing and playing in water. Put out empty cups and containers for children to fill and to pour back and forth in containers. Use some measuring cups to give them simple math lessons as they play. They can even try to fill cups under a sprinkler and see how much longer that takes than scooping water from a bucket or the pool.

 

Ice Cubes

Take those frozen, colored cubes you made and add them to the body of water. Children may squeal as they touch the icy cubes. They will enjoy swirling them and watching them melt in the cold water. Discuss how water changes from liquid to solid when put in the freezer and how it turns back to liquid as it warms up. Use some of the ice cubes for cube races to see how fast they slide down an incline. Have an ice cube toss.

 

Hydration

Since children are in the heat as they play, make sure they drink plenty of water. Set up a station where they can add in berries, lemon and orange wedges, or sprigs of mint to flavor the water. Talk about dehydration and signs of it (chapped lips, feeling hot, flushed, thirsty) and add a salty snack to help them retain fluids.


Check out the “Princess in Action” section of each day in The One Year My Princess Devotions for other water-fun ideas and more from Karen Whiting!


karen-whiting-author

Karen Whiting is an author and speaker with thirteen published books and hundreds of articles and short pieces for over four dozen publishers including Focus on the Family Magazine and Christian Parenting Today. She was a contributing writer for Focus on Your Child 2008-2009. She writes a quarterly article for Enrichment Journal for pastors and leaders of the Assemblies of God, a quarterly column for Discipleship Ideas magazine, and a family page for a monthly denominational newspaper. Whiting has also been the community producer and host of the television series Puppets on Parade for Miami educational TV.

Whiting has a heart for families and encourages families to connect and live more fully for God. She is a mother of five and a grandmother.

To learn more about Karen Whiting, follow her on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest.

How to Keep Breathing When All Seems Lost

From the earliest days of our marriage, I longed for and prayed for a large family.

My dream of love-filled, chaotic Christmas mornings came true when my only son presented me with the six most precious grandchildren on earth. They lived hundreds of miles away, but miles can’t affect the love of a grandma.

Each phone call was a treasure and each visit a joy of epic proportions. Is there a treasure of more worth than a ringing phone followed by six little voices yelling in unison across the miles, “I love you, Mimi!”?

Fourteen years of ever-increasing grandparent bliss came to an abrupt end with a sudden and bitter divorce.

Anger, hatred, and vengeance tore my world apart when my ex-daughter-in-law definitively declared my husband and I were no longer allowed any contact with our six little loves.

We had no rights or recourse.

The pain was beyond what words can convey. A good portion of our prayers were simply tears squeezed from broken hearts. “Why?” “What is the purpose?” “How can we I go on?”

It was six years before the first of our babies was old enough to re-establish contact. The sound of her voice on the phone bathed my shredded heart with a life-regenerating balm.

Over the next two years, two more of our precious ones came of age and chose to come back into our lives.

As I was in the process of directing the portrayal of Paul in Romans 8 of the NLT audio New Testament, Breathe, the fourth contacted us and came for a visit.

It was the first time we had even spoken to her in over ten years.

I listened in as the words of Paul, voiced by Kurt Naebig, sprang to life . . . and the words of God, penned by Paul, sprang to life within my heart:

God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God (Romans 8:28).

Three of our grandchildren have chosen to relocate to be close to us and one visits and calls on a regular basis. But there are still two who have grown up outside our world.

The twins were only five years old the last time we saw those sweet little faces. It has been twelve years since we held them close.

We do not know the purpose in our lives or the lives of our grandchildren for the years of separation and pain.

But as I heard Kurt Naebig read Romans 8:28, I was impacted again with the fact that God has a plan for my life and my grandchildren’s lives.

True faith stands through times that seem hopeless, secure in the knowledge that all things work together for good.

True faith stands through times that seem hopeless, secure in the knowledge that all things work together for good.

Even when traumatic loss rips all sense from life—the Holy Spirit strengthens us, prays the prayers that are too agonizing to voice on our own —and allows us to walk forward, ever closer to the glory revealed to us through Jesus.

There are days when success is remembering to just breathe.

Just breathe deep…. and inhale the grace and goodness of God. 

And then—exhale the stress and the strains of life. 

There is a way to breathe—that exhales worries and inhales the Word. 

It’s a strange grace—how in the spaces between the words of His Words — our soul finds the space it desperately needs to finally breathe.


The Breathe Bible Audio New Testament is a remarkably vivid listening experience that transports you into the world of the Bible. Performed in the New Living Translation by a cast of internationally acclaimed film, television and recording artists, this captivating multi-million dollar audio production features cinema-quality sound with an original music score. It’s an experience you will never forget. The Breathe Bible Audio New Testament—“It’s like being there.” Not only are 18 CDs are included in this premium audio product, it also includes a code to receive the user friendly mobile App for free! Listen however you like!

Learn more HERE.

This story was written by Brenda Noel and originally posted on Annvoskamp.com.