Tyndale Kids Posts

Broken and Beautiful: Teach Your Kids to Embrace Differences

We live in a world where conflict is often celebrated, forgiveness comes with conditions, and love has sometimes lost its meaning. What can we do to counter the negative impact our culture has on future generations?

As parents and grandparents, we each have remarkable power and influence over the future of our children and grandchildren. Their ability to resolve conflict, forgive, and love depends on how we resolve conflict, how we forgive, and how we love. Most important of these is how we love. Because love forgives without condition and never celebrates conflict.

Our society is filled with messages that scream, “Be like him!” or “Dress like her!” Through news and politics that propagate fear and dissension, differences have become focal points for conflict and pain rather than something to embrace. But stepping into conversations about differences with love and grace is one of the most important and formative things we can do for the children we love. So where do we start?

We begin by acknowledging that we are all different and that our differences should be celebrated and embraced. We begin by acknowledging that we are all broken in our own way and that in our brokenness there is so much beauty. Beauty in overcoming challenges together, beauty in allowing others to do for us what we can’t do on our own, beauty in lifting others up knowing that they will one day do the same for someone else.

In Matthew 25, as Jesus tells the parable of the goats and the sheep, there are many lessons. But perhaps the most important is one that should influence how we lead our children.

Feed the hungry . . .

Give a drink to the thirsty . . .

Invite the stranger in . . .

Clothe the naked . . .

Care for the sick . . .

Visit the imprisoned . . .

Because we are all hungry and thirsty in some way, we will all be a stranger at some point, we will all be stripped naked by life’s circumstances, we will all experience sickness, and we are all prisoners to something. Fear, weakness, addiction, a diagnosis—we are all broken in our different ways. But when we come together to carry each other, we are beautiful. God created us in His own image, and that image shines brightly when we love as He loves.

The greatest beauty we can ever experience, the greatest beauty we will ever witness, can be known only through our brokenness.

What do we do to counter the impact our culture has on future generations? We embrace our differences through love and teach our children that we are all broken and beautiful.


Written by Patrick Gray, author of The Push.

When Marcus moved next door to John, they knew instantly they’d be friends. Now John and Marcus do almost everything together. They go on lots of adventures, with Marcus pushing John’s wheelchair and John fueling their escapades with jokes. Through their friendship, the boys discover that their unique gifts make them stronger together.

Based on the friendship of real-life best friends Patrick Gray and Justin Skeesuck, The Push teaches kids that people of all abilities have important roles to play and that we’re all better together than we are on our own.

Learn more about the book HERE>>

Enter to Win a Spring Book Bundle

Easter is coming soon, and it’s time to adorn your child’s bookshelf with new titles! The First Bible Memory Series by Kathryn O’Brien is perfect for early readers and is now available as board books! Learn more HERE>>

We are giving away a spring book bundle in March to one lucky winner. Enter to win this list of books below!

God Made the World by Sarah Jean Collins

God Made the World board book tells the story of creation in simple, easy to remember rhymes with art that is engaging and fun for young children. And it is sure to become a classic introductory creation storybook that will be used by countless families and teachers. Learn more HERE>>



Flash the Donkey Makes New Friends by Rachel Anne Ridge

Flash the Donkey Makes New Friends is the heartwarming story of a not-so-ordinary donkey who needs a special place to belong. Inspired by Rachel Anne Ridge’s memoir Flash, named one of Publishers Weekly’s Best Summer Books of 2015, kids will fall in love with this endearing donkey as they learn to appreciate the value of true friendship. Learn more HERE>>


Wow! The Good New in Four Words by Dandi Daley Mackall

For anyone looking for a fresh way to present the gospel to young children, Wow! The Good News in Four Words is a perfect resource. This whimsical and fun book outlines the gospel in a simple and memorable way (for both adults and kids!), using fun words to highlight the story. The book will present Creation/Genesis (Wow!), The Fall (Uh-oh . . .), Redemption/Jesus’ Life and Sacrifice (Yes!), Restoration/The New Heaven (Aaahhhh), ending with one last Wow because we get to go out and tell the Good News! Learn more HERE>>


Does God Take Naps? by Crystal Bowman and Teri McKinley

Kids ask a lot of questions. Some silly and some innocent. Some deep and some serious. The books in the I’ve Got Questions series address many of those childlike questions and offer satisfying answers. The content is lively and fun, yet meaningful and respectful of a child’s inquisitive mind. While the books have a strong educational component, the deeper purpose is to show parents how they can respond to their child’s questions with patience and love. Learn more HERE>>


The Character Builder’s Bible by iCharacter Limited, Agnes de Bezenac, and Salem de Bezenac

Featuring 60 Bible stories with colorful illustrations, definitions, and memory verses, The Character Builder’s Bible will show your little ones that God’s Word is relevant to their lives and will help you instill biblical character in their hearts. Learn more HERE>>





Your Magnificent Chooser by John Ortberg

John Ortberg addresses the ability to choose in a whimsical way by inviting children to use their “magnificent chooser” that God gave them to make right choices daily. Parents will love reading this book to their kids, and kids will enjoy the content while learning lessons that will stay with them throughout their lives. Learn more HERE>>


A Child’s Perspective on the Holy Spirit by Sharon Leavitt

Tyndale Kids

My granddaughter Emily is four years old and an interesting combination of cautious extrovert. She loves being on center stage but has a fair degree of anxiety about trying new things, and even randomly resists participating in normal routines at times. She internalizes stress, and it comes out as being clingy to Mom, refusing, resisting, etc. Not uncommon, I know.

I gave her a copy of Your Magnificent Chooser by John Ortberg when it first came out, and every time I’ve visited her, which is several times a year, she has me read it to her.


Now to the part that made my heart sing.

Emily’s chronic anxiety surfaced recently, and she decided that she was finished with swim lessons.

My daughter Mary told her quitting was not an option because she needs to know how to swim from a safety standpoint. Mary said Emily could take her time getting in the water, but that she was going to learn how to swim.

Well, last Saturday, Emily called me to report, “Even though I was really scared and didn’t want to go into the water, I did! And it was okay!”

I asked her how she felt after doing that and how it happened.

She said, “It was fun. I heard something in my head say it was okay to go . . . It was my Chooser!”

Having had some training in spiritual direction and knowing that one of the most important things we can learn to cultivate is self-awareness and sensitivity to the Holy Spirit, I was floored!

Little four-year-old Emily was proving that the goal of this book – spiritual formation and sensitivity to the Spirit’s leading – had been accomplished!

I told her that the Chooser was God’s Spirit in her, helping her, and I was so very proud of her because I’m still learning that.

For a Christian grandparent, there is nothing more important than seeing evidence that your grandchildren are “getting” it and the Spirit of God is pursuing our beloved little ones.

Sharon Leavitt has been a part of the team at Tyndale since 2001. She works with authors, partners, and agents in her role as senior author relations manager. Sharon considers her role a calling to represent and champion Tyndale to authors, and, at the same time, to advocate for and represent authors to Tyndale. Her desire is to be a practical help to authors throughout the publishing process, ensuring that the creation of their books from beginning to end is a pleasant and navigable journey. Sharon graduated from Trinity International University with a bachelor of arts degree in communications. Sharon loves and prays for people, is a trained spiritual director, and tells her husband, Ralph, that she has the best job in the house.


Help Your Tween Girl Avoid the Comparison Game by Sherry Kyle

Tyndale Kids

When was the last time you heard your tween girl compare herself with others?

Maybe the person she is comparing herself to is better at sports, gets better grades, or has more friends. Or maybe she has perfect hair, flawless skin, and can sing and dance.

Maybe your daughter feels like a loser with a capital L.

Most of the time, tween girls feel awkward in their bodies and hope their BFF still wants to be friends. Most of the time, tween girls want to know they are loved.

How do you help your daughter in times like these? How do you help her understand God’s unconditional love?

  • As a parent, before you can do anything for your daughter, you need to understand God’s unconditional love for yourself. When you have a personal relationship with Jesus, you will understand the sacrifice he made for you—and for your girl.
  • Next, show your daughter how much you love her. If you love your child during the good times and the frustrating, get-on-your-last nerve times, you are telling her that nothing she does will make you love her any less. By loving her through thick and thin, you are showing God’s unconditional love.
  • Finally, get your daughter connected. Are you part of a church? Are there people in your daughter’s life who can speak God’s unconditional love to her? Do you have books for her to read that encourage and inspire?

Love, Lexi: Letters to God is an award-winning and exciting devotional experience for girls ages eight through fourteen. Each entry starts with a fictional letter to God from seventh-grader Alexis Dawn Cooper, a.k.a. Lexi, who humorously shares with God what’s going on in middle school and her life.

Love, Lexi: Letters to God also includes responses directly from God’s Word, short devotional thoughts, and journaling pages for your daughter to share her story.

Your tween girl will discover, along with Lexi, that when she compares herself with others, it’s easy to feel like she doesn’t measure up. She’ll always be able to find someone who she feels is better than her in some area. But God created her special and one-of-a-kind, and He loves her just the way she is—with her unique looks, talents, and personality. God loves her hair, the shape of her nose, the color of her skin, and the sound of her laugh. Your tween girl is made in God’s image and exactly how He designed her to be.

By the end, Lexi learns to seek God first above all else. And by reading Love, Lexi: Letters to God, your daughter will contemplate her own special place in God’s eyes.

Sherry Kyle has written several books for tween girls, along with women’s fiction. Her award-winning book for tween girls, The Christian Girl’s Guide to Style, was awarded the God Mom’s Choice Award. Her second nonfiction book for girls, The Girl’s Guide to Your Dream Room, was nominated for the Christian Retailers Best Awards.


Ways to Learn More Bible Truths as a Family This Year by Kathy Cassel

Tyndale Kids

For many of us, the ink is barely dry on our New Year’s resolutions; yet within a few weeks, those same resolutions are forgotten or ignored. The motivation has worn off, and the newness of the year is past. We skip the morning run and eat that dessert we swore off.

While those resolutions may be important, the best resolution we can have is to get into God’s Word in the new year—individually, and also as a family.


It is crucial that we have personal time for Bible reading and prayer so we can grow in our faith and be the role models God plans for us to be for our children. Yet, it is also vital to establish a time to dig into God’s Word as a family.

If the thought of a family devotion time causes dread or anxiety, you might be making it too hard or overthinking the matter. While family time needs to be a daily priority, it doesn’t have to be a long, formal time. Set aside fifteen minutes each day to plug into God’s Word.

Make it fun to learn more about the Bible. You can do this by using The One Year Book of Bible Trivia for Kids, which will help you teach your children something new about the Bible every day. Even though the book is geared for youth, it’s appropriate for the whole family. You might learn something new too!

Each devotion starts with a trivia question about the Bible. Begin the year in the book of Genesis and end with Revelation. Since the devotion starts with a question, it might be fun to read the opening trivia question to your children in the morning (or write it on a white board) and let them figure out the answer before you meet at dinnertime or in the evening to read the devotion. Or if you prefer to have your family devotions in the morning, give the children the question the night before and encourage them to find the answer by morning.


Some of the answers may be obvious, but others may be about Bible people or places that are unfamiliar. If children are reluctant to take part, make it a competition. You can have your children write their answers on a piece of paper and give them to you. Tally the right answers during the week, and have a prize at the end of the week for the child with the highest number of correct answers or for everyone who reaches a prearranged number of correct answers.

No matter what other resolutions you make this year, set a goal as a family to get into God’s Word each day to learn something new.

Katrina (Kathy) is author of several Tyndale books, including The One Year Devotions for Girls Starring Women of the Bible and the One Year Book of Bible Trivia. She’s also the author of The Christian Girl’s Guide to Being Your Best, The Christian Girl’s Guide to the Bible and several other books for the teen/tween audience. Katrina has a BS degree in elementary education from Grace College, Winona Lake, Indiana, and a M.Ed. with a reading specialty from The University of North Dakota. Katrina has worked with children of all ages in a variety of educational and church settings. She and her husband have eight children and live in Panama City, Florida.



To learn more about Kathy, find her on Facebook, or visit her at her website, www.kathycassel.com.