joy Posts

The Best Habit to Cultivate When Joy Is Eluding You by Dandi Daley Mackall

Tyndale Kids

Katy wore her purple jersey proudly, thrilled to be part of the Dragons. The thump, thump, thump of a dozen practice balls echoed in the gym.

I watched my daughter smile at every player on the basketball court, even those on the opposing team, the Bears.

“Go, Ka—Dragons!” I shouted from the bleachers. Katy had coached her dad and me not to cheer, “Go, Katy!” Only, “Go, Dragons!”

She jogged out of sight. When she returned, she was pushing a wheelchair with a man I judged to be about forty, twice Katy’s age. He was wearing a Superman T-shirt, and his smile matched Katy’s.

I didn’t think he was on either team, but I wasn’t sure.

A whistle blew, and athletes were introduced as they ran to center court to the cheers of the crowd. Brian skipped onto the court, hands clasped above his head as if he was already the champ. Leslie pranced out, looking paler than the snow we all drove through to get here.

And Craig. Too shy, or frightened, to join his team on the court, he paced just out of bounds until Katy ran over and took his hand, leading him out as far as he’d allow.

Unable to help himself, my husband yelled, “Go, Katy!” She shook her head at him. Someone shouted, “Play ball!”

Katy didn’t come off the bench until third quarter. Even then, she couldn’t get her hands on the ball because the Dragons’ two best players were ball hogs.

Poor Katy ran up and down the court, arms outstretched, pleading for the ball. The boys paid no attention.

But it was obvious that one boy on the Bears team couldn’t keep his eyes off her. Each time they passed on the court, he stopped and smiled, mesmerized.

Someone passed him the ball. The kid’s smile turned back to Katy. He handed that ball to her.

Confused, Katy glanced up at us and shrugged. She returned the Bear’s grin, then shot the ball. Nothin’ but net!

It was the only shot she made all year. The gym erupted in shouts of joy. Even the Bears and their parents cheered.

The Dragons trailed by one. Katy had the ball with two minutes left in the game. Then a wonderful thing happened. Katy walked toward Craig, who still paced the out-of-bounds lane.

The gym hushed as Katy stepped out of bounds and took Craig’s hand.

The clock ran out, but nobody moved. Craig tried to squirm away, but Katy held on until he stepped across the line. She put the ball in his hands, and his arms sprang as if on coils. He missed the backboard. But the bleachers emptied, with both sides cheering their hearts out.

Every person in that gym experienced true joy, shared joy.

And I prayed that God would show me how to share joy in other areas, instead of competing for only one joy—mine.

That evening in the gym, joy poured out of me abundantly, spontaneously. But the truth is that joy doesn’t always come so easily.

Sometimes I find myself wishing that parenting a child with special needs brought with it more moments of straightforward joy. Or perhaps that my joy looked more like other people’s joy.

I knew a couple of weeks after Katy’s birth that she wasn’t developing the way other babies did.

By age two, she required speech therapy, physical therapy, and occupational therapy.

When she was three, she lost 40 percent of her hearing overnight and was diagnosed with nephritis and Alport Syndrome, a nasty neurological disorder.

I don’t recall feeling joyful as other moms chatted about their precocious toddlers.

I do remember my daughter, big grin and wide eyes, rushing home after kindergarten one day and shouting, “Guess what! Allyson can tie her own shoelaces her own self!”

She was ecstatic, but my first thought was: And you can’t.

Why is it easier to share the sorrows of others than it is to share their joy?

I’ve always marveled at Mary’s relative, Elizabeth, wife of Zachariah and mother of John the Baptist.

When Elizabeth received a visit from Mary, the future mother of the Messiah, wouldn’t Elizabeth’s natural response have been, Why not me? I’m from the priestly line of Aaron. I’m married. Zachariah is a priest and would make the perfect father. God considered me righteous. Yet my son will not consider himself worthy to tie the sandal straps of your Son? Jesus must increase while John decreases?

Instead: “Elizabeth gave a glad cry and exclaimed to Mary, ‘God has blessed you above all women, and your child is blessed. Why am I so honored, that the mother of my Lord should visit me? When I heard your greeting, the baby in my womb jumped for joy.’” (Luke 1:42-44, NLT)

Elizabeth was overjoyed because she shared Mary’s joy.

And it’s not an accident that Katy is one of the happiest people I’ve met.

She gets more than her share of joy . . . because she, too, shares other people’s joys.

I am still learning from Katy.

Perhaps we all can.

Yes, you should rejoice, and I will share your joy. Philippians 2:18


Dandi Daley Mackall is an award-winning author of nearly 500 books for all ages. She is winner of the Helen Keating Ott Award for Contributions to Children’s Literature, ECPA Children’s Book of the Year 2015, the OCIRA (International Reading Association’s) Hall of Fame, the Edgar Award, ALA-YALSA Best Fiction for Young Adults, Mom’s Choice Awards, and others. She was a missionary behind the Iron Curtain (the basis for Eva Underground). Her new book, Larger-Than-Life Lara, is a unique and multilayered story for young readers, with equal parts humor and angst. The central character, Laney, communicates the art of storytelling as it happens while weaving an unforgettable tale of the new girl, whose Christlike kindness and forgiveness transform the entire class…until nobody remains unchanged, not even the reader. This is a powerful and emotional story.


This piece was originally written as a guest post for Ann Voskamp’s blog. Ann is the New York Times bestselling author of The Wonder of the Greatest Gift, The Greatest Gift, and Unwrapping the Greatest Gift.  

the-wonder-of-the-greatest-gift-book

the-greatest-gift-book

unwrapping-the-greatest-gift


 

Seven Snow Day Activities for Endless Indoor Fun by Emily Bonga

Tyndale Kids

When I was in elementary school, I distinctly remember the excitement of the phone ringing bright and early after a night of intense snowfall. Mom or Dad would answer the phone, and their face would say it all: We had a snow day! A whole day of freedom from schoolwork was a dream come true for my little, elementary-aged self; but I’m sure my parents were wondering how we would pass the time on these completely-unanticipated, stuck-inside kind of days. They would have loved a list of outside-the-box activities for me and my sisters that provided fun, active alternatives to watching television all day.

Below are seven interactive, indoor activities for your little ones the next time a snow day blows into town.

Enjoy!


play-dough

Make Your Own Play Dough—Play dough can be made from just four ingredients that are typically found in the home—flour, salt, warm water, and food coloring. Not only will your kids enjoy making the play dough with you, but they’ll also love using it to make their own creations after the mixing is finished! Click here to find an article that not only has a recipe for creating your own play dough, but also suggests various household items your children could use while playing with the dough.


story-travelers-bible

Story Travelers Bible Game—In The Story Travelers Bible, the Story Travelers, Lana Griffin and Munch, hop on an extraordinary bus and take a tour through some of the greatest stories in the Bible. The kids watch Noah build his ark, see Moses discover the burning bush, and stand on the shore as John baptizes Jesus.

Your kids can become Story Travelers, too, with the free, downloadable Story Travelers game! In this game, players must act out Bible events to make it to the finish line. You can make the game as long or as short as you want by printing out extra blank spaces. The game could go over furniture, under tables, or up stairs! The possibilities are endless with this story-traveling adventure.


hot-chocolate

Hot Chocolate—Who doesn’t love a cup of hot cocoa on a cold, snowy day? Here’s a list of fun mix-ins for your kids to add to their cocoa to make it snow-day-special:

  • Candy Canes (which double as stirring sticks for anything else you may be mixing in!)
  • Marshmallows
  • Colored Sprinkles
  • M&M’s or other chocolate candies
  • Whipped cream
  • Hershey’s chocolate syrup and/or caramel sauce
  • Pirouettes (which can also be used to stir)

Pool Noodle Race Track—Do you have a pool noodle in your garage or attic from summer days spent poolside or at the beach? Repurpose it into a racetrack for marbles or matchbox cars and enjoy the racing fun! Click here for materials you’ll need to get started and for instructions on how to set up your track.


your-magnificent-chooserYour Magnificent Chooser ActivitiesWe all have choices to make each day, even the youngest children. The choices we make play a large part in forming who we grow to be as adults. In Your Magnificent Chooser, author John Ortberg whimsically addresses the ability to make choices, inviting children to use the “magnificent chooser” that God gave them to make right choices every day.                                                            

Lots of free resources are available for you and your children as you apply the concepts found in the book Your Magnificent Chooser! Click on the links below to check out these various activities.


Create a Blanket Fort—Forts are warm, cozy spaces that are perfect for playing pretend, reading books, or sharing your favorite stories. Using extra sheets, blankets, couch cushions, or pillows that you have on hand, help your child create a blanket fort. When we made them in our house, we would pull out the kitchen chairs and use those to build the “outline” for our forts. Clothespins were clipped to the linens to close gaps between blankets or sheets. Be sure to have a flashlight on hand if your child will be reading inside the fort!


tea-party

Throw a tea party—Growing up, my sisters and I had a little, plastic tea-party play set that would keep us entertained for hours. Each time we threw a tea party, we would fill the teacups to the brim with “tea” (usually water from the tap!) and don our fanciest dress-up clothes as we sat cross-legged on the family room floor enjoying our oh-so-fancy snack that usually consisted of Goldfish crackers or pretzels. Tea parties provide a great way for your kids to exercise their imagination while also honing their etiquette skills!


Here’s to a future snow day full of creative, playful fun!


Sources:

https://www.diynatural.com/homemade-playdough/

https://familyfoodandtravel.com/2015/08/pool-noodle-race-track.html


Emily Bonga is the Marketing and Publishing Coordinator for the Tyndale Books team.

7 Ways to Keep Christ at the Center of Christmas

Tyndale Kids

nativity-scene-christmas

Are you ready for Christmas? It’s one of the most commonly asked questions this time of year, and can be answered a multitude of ways. We talk about the presents we have – or have not yet – bought. We expound on how busy we are with church and other activities. We express our gratefulness for the ability to spend more time with our family during the season. We often even mention in passing that we are thankful for the manger and all that it represents to our lives.

All of the things listed above are great, but what if we considered answering the question in a different way? What if we marked our readiness for Christmas by the state of our hearts, not the number of presents under the tree? Have we, in our hearts, spent time at the manger pondering on the incredible gift God gave us over 2,000 years ago? Do we teach our children what Christmas is really all about?

I’d love to share some ideas to help you prepare yourself and your children for the miracle of Christmas.


wonder-of-the-greatest-gift-advent-devotional

1) Find an advent book or devotional to go through as a family. I highly recommend The Wonder of the Greatest Gift, by Ann Voskamp. Based on her bestseller Unwrapping the Greatest Gift, Ann Voskamp expands her presentation of the timeless Advent tradition of the Jesse Tree with this beautiful keepsake that can be handed down and enjoyed for generations. Click here to watch a video that further explains how this beautiful pop-up book works!


toys

2) Encourage your kids go through their toys/clothes and choose some that are in good shape to others who might be in need. This helps them to focus more on giving to others, not just receiving gifts at Christmas.


3) Schedule a family night to serve at a shelter in your area. Seeing others in need helps to put our own abundance into perspective and reminds us of the many blessings we have been given.


4) Throw a birthday party for Jesus on Christmas Eve. Every year, our family makes a cake for Him, we sing to Him, and make the night all about celebrating our Savior.


family-bible-reading

5) Consider reading the story of Christ’s birth as a family Christmas Eve, Christmas morning – or both! We use the account in Luke 2:1-20. Take turns reading verses so that everyone feels like they are a part of the moment.


6) Attend your church’s Christmas Eve and/or Christmas services together as a family. Worshiping together will help to forge a special bond between your family members?


7) Invite someone who does not have family in the area to join you for Christmas. We have done that many years, and it has ended up being as much a blessing for us as it was for the friends who joined us.


Merry Christmas to you and your family! Thank you for being part of our Tyndale family. We are grateful for each of you, and we pray God’s blessings on you and your families over the next year!!


Linda Howard is Associate Publisher for Kids and Youth products at Tyndale House Publishers. She has been with Tyndale since 2007.

The Secret to a Stress-Free Christmas

Tyndale Kids


Luke 1:26-38

In the sixth month of Elizabeth’s pregnancy, God sent the angel Gabriel to Nazareth, a village in Galilee, to a virgin named Mary. She was engaged to be married to a man named Joseph, a descendant of King David. Gabriel appeared to her and said, “Greetings, favored woman! The Lord is with you!”

Confused and disturbed, Mary tried to think what the angel could mean. “Don’t be afraid, Mary,” the angel told her, “for you have found favor with God! You will conceive and give birth to a son, and you will name him Jesus. He will be very great and will be called the Son of the Most High. The Lord God will give him the throne of his ancestor David. And he will reign over Israel forever; his Kingdom will never end!”

Mary asked the angel, “But how can this happen? I am a virgin.”

The angel replied, “The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you. So the baby to be born will be holy, and he will be called the Son of God. What’s more, your relative Elizabeth has become pregnant in her old age! People used to say she was barren, but she has conceived a son and is now in her sixth month. For nothing is impossible with God.”

Mary responded, “I am the Lord’s servant. May everything you have said about me come true.” And then the angel left her.


girl-praying-at-sunset

She became a space.

Mary—she opens her hands and she nods.

And the promises come true in the space of her surrender—the pod of the Most High God lodging within her willing yes.

Beneath her heart—in one yielded space—beats the thrumming love of God.

There is no need to produce or perform or perfect—simply become a place for God. That is all.

Now, here, in this juncture of time and space, God chooses the inconceivable—grace.

And conceives Himself to deliver grace into the world.

Conceive: it’s not passive, but an active verb. Its root in Latin means nothing less than “to seize, to take hold of.” When grace conceives in you, you take hold of God.

woman-praying-in-field

When you are a space to receive whatever the will of God is in this moment as grace, you take hold of God. You most take hold of God when you simply receive Him in this moment taking hold of you.

Taking hold of your unsure hand.

Taking hold of your unseen needs.

Taking hold of your unknown stress.

He wants to take hold of you, to be with you. He wants to carry you, to be carried by you, to have relationship with you.

The being with is always the gift, not merely the doing for. Because God knows: relationship is the only reality; there is nothing else. The way He lives in Trinity, the way we are tethered to Him, to His Body. The way He is with us and in us; the way we make space for Christ to grow us, unfold Love in us; the way the life of Christ stirs amazing grace within.

The way anywhere you make space for someone, you become a womb for God.

woman-comforting-child

He comes to you as the exhausted man over a plate of cold food, the brushed-off kid in the hall, the loud woman peppering your patience with a thousand questions. When you slow and let your eyes fully receive theirs or your words nourish small things—anytime you’re a safe place for another soul or you open and conceive grace—you become a womb for God. Nothing is impossible with Him.

Christmas is conceived in your world when you simply receive it—however Christ and His will comes to you. When we think we’re the ones who will have to produce Christmas, we only half-wrap the notion that we think the saving of the world begins with us. There is a name for this, and it is called idolatry.

No one can receive anything unless God gives it from heaven,” says the one who is preparing the way (John 3:27, emphasis added).

Hear it like an echo of the heavenlies: Christmas can’t be made, like people can’t be self-made, like dreams can’t be force-made. Everything is given from heaven. Everything is gift. Your life becomes a masterpiece the moment you see it as a gift of grace to willingly receive.

woman-with-arm-outstretched

It is more blessed to give than to receive—and it may be more of a struggle to receive than to give. Christmas humbles: we are not the givers we long to be. Nor are we the receivers God woos us to be.

Mary kneels before us this first Christmas not as a woman producing, performing, or perfecting but simply bending before a God who has all the power to dispatch angels, enfold Himself in embryonic cells, choreograph the paths of stars—a God who quietly beckons every man, every woman to simply come, bend, make a space, receive.

This is the chronology of grace, the chronology of Christmas: before we’re called to give, we’re called to receive.

This can be the hardest. We struggle to receive. Sometimes we are better givers than getters. Grace? For me?

woman-staring-at-mountains

I don’t have to bring anything? I don’t have make anything, produce anything, perform anything? What if someone sees . . . how empty I am? How I am not enough, how my gifts are not enough, how giving all I’ve got is never enough? How there are empty places in me, gaping places in me—all these hollow, starving places?

And Mary nods to you in the last days of Advent. Only one thing is necessary—be a space for Love to come. You simply have to receive Love. Let yourself be loved.

Will you let Me fill all your emptiness with Love? Receive my Love? Conceive My grace?

It’s for you.

“Nothing is more repugnant to capable, reasonable people than grace,” writes John Wesley.[i] And nothing is harder for capable people at Christmas to simply come and receive.

Don’t let this be the gift you refuse. The grace is for you.

Your greatest gift is not your gifts, but your surrendered yes to be a space for God.

woman-praying-in-snow

The miscarriage of Christmas begins when anxieties crowd out space within simply to carry Christ. Make room; be a womb. Be a womb to receive Christ everywhere, and it is He who delivers everyone.

So you let the last of the trimmings go.

Cease the pace to do, buy, produce more.

Find the calendar and erase.

Somewhere make space.

And you can feel the space become a sanctuary. Sanctity stilling the crush. Glory overshadowing everything else.

And time holds its breath, and the whirl of this old whirligig world holds for half a blink . . . and God comes in the fullness of His love into the willing space.

And time exhales relief, and the angels dance joy, and the velvet hush of grace received falls over this place like a coverlet over a waiting child.



Take ten today. Ten minutes. Make five minutes of space and stillness and silence just with God. Then make five minutes of space in your day for someone else, and let that person fill all your attention. Invite God and His love to indwell you today.



[i] David L. Larsen, The Evangelism Mandate: Recovering the Centrality of Gospel Preaching (Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications, 1992), 155.


from The Greatest Gift by Ann Voskamp.

2014 “Christian Retailing’s Best” award winner!
In what is sure to become an instant holiday classic, Voskamp reaches back into the pages of the Old Testament to explore the lineage of Jesus via the advent tradition of “The Jesse Tree.”

Beginning with Jesse, the father of David, The Greatest Gift retraces the epic pageantry of mankind, from Adam to the Messiah, with each day’s reading pointing to the coming promise of Christ.

Sure to become a holiday staple in every Christian home, The Greatest Gift is the perfect gift for the holidays and a timeless reminder of the true meaning of Christmas.


Learn more about exciting new ways to celebrate this Advent season with your family! >>

Customize Your Jesse Tree with The Wonder of the Greatest Gift

Tyndale Kids

I’ve always loved getting ready for Christmas. When I was little, my grandma would buy each of her grandchildren chocolate Advent calendars, and my sisters and I would make a game out of guessing what shape the candies behind each door would be. Through the years, my family’s Advent traditions have evolved, and I’m really excited to introduce a new one to them this year: Ann Voskamp’s The Wonder of the Greatest Gift.

The Wonder of the Greatest Gift is a strikingly unique way to celebrate the Advent season. The fourteen-inch pop-up Jesse Tree doubles as a Christmas decoration, and as you get closer to Christmas, you add more and more ornaments to the tree. To make the Jesse Tree even more special to your family, you can customize the tree with glitter and spangles! Jackie Nunez, designer behind The Wonder of the Greatest Gift, spent an evening with her family using tiny string lights and spangles to make their Jesse Tree their own.

There are all sorts of ways you can decorate your tree. Try some of these ideas, and be sure to post photos of your completed work. Tag them with #tyndalekids so we can see your family’s special tree!

Below are some more ideas for decorating your Jesse Tree: